February 7, 2006

Bio

About

M.A. Anthropology, Ph.D. Education, Ph.D. Anthropology, Stanford University

Research Director of the Digital Media and Learning Hub
University of California Humanities Research Institute

Professor in Residence and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning
Department of Anthropology and Department of Informatics, University of California, Irvine

Advisory Board Chair
Connected Learning Alliance

I am a cultural anthropologist who studies new media use, particularly among young people in Japan and the US. During my graduate work at Stanford, I worked at the Institute for Research on Learning, Xerox PARC, and Apple, studying up the emerging field of social and cultural studies of digital technology use. My doctoral work was part of the Fifth Dimension project led by Michael Cole. For many years I had a research group at Keio studying mobile technology use. A few years ago I completed a study with Peter Lyman and Michael Carter on a multi-year project on digital kids and informal learning, with support from the MacArthur Foundation. As part of this, I did case studies of anime fandoms in Japan and the English-speaking online world, focusing on anime music videos and fansubs. I edited a book for MIT Press with Daisuke Okabe and Misa Matsuda entitled, Personal, Portable, Pedestrian: Mobile Phones in Japanese Life., and my book on children's software is Engineering Play: A Cultural History of Children's Software. My co-authored book reporting on the digital youth project, Hanging Out, Messing Around, and Geeking Out: Kids Living and Learning with New Media. My research on anime fandom appears in a book I helped edit, Fandom Unbound: Otaku Culture in a Connected World.


Professional credentials: a doctorate in Anthropology and a doctorate in Education, both from Stanford. Past workplaces: University of Southern California's Annenberg Center and School of Cinematic Arts, The Institute for Research on Learning, Xerox PARC, Tokyo University, the National Institute for Educational Research in Japan, and Apple Computer.

Posted by Mizuko Ito at February 7, 2006 2:25 PM